The Cassowary

11279_02-04.tifThe Cassowary lives in Far North Queensland rainforests and is the 3rd largest flightless bird in the world.  Descended directly from the dinosaurs about 80 million years ago and receiving its name from Papua New Guinea ‘Kasu’ meaning horned and ‘weri’ meaning head.  This endangered species has less than 1,000 left in the wild and plays a vital role in dispersing seeds in its droppings and supporting the vital echo systems of the rainforests.  Numbers have dropped due to human inhabitants,  dogs, wild pigs, cyclones and vehicle strikes.    The original of this painting is 600 x600mm $1,800.00 and  exhibiting at the Tanks Art Gallery until the 26thApril 2015.  This painting has been reproduced into Limited edition prints, Tea Towels, Placemats , coasters and fridge magnets.

Kookaburras at the Henry Ross Lookout

kookaburras at the Henry Ross 008The Henry Ross Lookout is on the Kuranda range between Cairns and Kuranda. A great view of some of Cairns mountains and looking out over the Great Barrier Reef.  You will also see the Cairns airport , Machans and Holloways Beach, Freshwater, Aeroglen Stratford, the Barron River and the Captain Cook Highway. The Kookaburras and the Ulysses butterfly amongst some pretty weeds in the foreground.  for sale $995

Return of the Rainbows

Kingfishers Paradise [inset]

Kingfishers Paradise [inset]

On the Lookout

On the Rainforests Edge just a few kilometers west of Kuranda in Far North Queensland -this Rainbow Lorikeet is visiting this flowering Eucalyptus tree.  He seems to be “On the Lookout” for other birds or perhaps another tree with better berries to forage.
This painting won the Highly Commended award in Mareeba Art Show 2010.

In My Backyard

The flowering trees around Cairns in the springtime is really a pretty site!. Pictured here “In My Backyard”,  the Cassia tree  is often visited by the Rainbow Lorikeet Birds coming to forage nectar and pollen from the pink blossoms.  This is a common sight in and around Cairns and is a birdwatchers paradise.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cheeky Lorikeet

The Rainbow Lorikeet is a cheeky bird because they come so close to you happily chattering and foraging the flowers in your garden as if youre not there.  This Lorikeet is perched on my Golden Cane Palm in my backyard.  These birds dont eat seeds, but they love pollen and nectar from flowers.  They are always in groups and can be found on the East coast of Australia.  The males can put on a real show for the female and this  behaviour is really the only way you can tell what sex they are.   This painting is in fact sold but I have a few prints on hand.

Breakfast in the Tropics

In World Heritage Rainforest, just a few kilometers west of Cairns
this is the Scaley Breasted Lorikeet pushing his way through the clusters of native Eucalyptus flowers to get the most of his breakfast.

Return of the Rainbows

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Far North Queensland is known for its World Heritage Rainforest canopies that meet  with the  crystal clear waters of the Great Barrier Reef.        
The Rainbow Lorikeets fly in groups from tree to tree searching for the fruits of the Rainforest. Pictured here in this painting – foraging a palette of  the Umbrella Tree berries  which they can get quite intoxicated  from and at times can cause them to fall out of the tree in a drunken stupor.  
Way to go!!  Sorry , this painting is SOLD    

The Tropical Kiss

The screeching of the beautiful Eclectus Parrots cuts through the silence of the Rainforests and echos for miles across mountain ranges to reach the woody plains and outbacks of Cape York Pennisula.  The Male is the Green Parrot and the Female is the Red.  This pair is perched on the Native Penda tree which is the floral emblem of Cairns.